Can you review this summary of things to know about private pilot training and certification? It's short.?

October 12, 2008

This is just an overview of things I think I should know about pilot training and certification, questions are in brackets [ ]. Mainly I want to know is this is everything I should have for the tests I will be taking, but any other info is appreciated.

Private Pilot Ground Training

Chapter 1 – Section A – Pilot Training

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulates commercial and general aviation. The rules issued by the FAA for aviation are called the Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs).

Pilot training can often be done at an airport, at schools called fixed base operators (FBOs). FBOs are governed by FARs 61 (certification) and 141 (Regarding flight training schools). FAA Certified Flight Instructors (CFIs) are employed by FBOs to provide training in the airplane. [How do FARs 61 and 141 apply to the FBOs?]

[What REQUIREMENTS are there regarding ground training before you can get a pilot's license?]
At least a student pilot certificate is required to fly solo. To obtain a student pilot certificate you must: Be 16 years or older, have a 3rd class medical certificate, and be able to read, speak, write, and understand English.

A medical certificate is obtained by passing a physical fitness test administered by an authorized medical examiner (AME).

The medical certificates come in 3 different classes; 3rd, 2nd, and 1st.
3rd class and above covers recreational/student/private pilots for 3 years (2 if over 40 years old).
2nd class and above covers commercial pilots for 1 year.
1st class covers airline transport pilots (ATPs) for 6 months.

FAR part 61 describes the standards for medical certificates.
At least a student pilot certificate is required to fly solo. To obtain a student pilot certificate you must: Be 16 years or older, have a 3rd class medical certificate, and be able to read, speak, write, and understand English.

A medical certificate is obtained by passing a physical fitness test administered by an authorized medical examiner (AME).

The medical certificates come in 3 different classes; 3rd, 2nd, and 1st.
3rd class and above covers recreational/student/private pilots for 3 years (2 if over 40 years old).
2nd class and above covers commercial pilots for 1 year.
1st class covers airline transport pilots (ATPs) for 6 months.

FAR part 61 describes the standards for medical certificates.
Requirements for private pilot certification:
1. 17 years of age or older
2. Training and flight time (40+ hours, 20 duel and 10 solo min., or 35+ hours, 20 dual, 5 solo min. if from a FAR 141 approved school.)
3. Passing knowledge test
4. Passing practical test (includes oral quizzing, pilot operations, and maneuvers)

Having private pilot certification allows you to act as pilot in command of an aircraft (PIC), and share operating expenses of it, you cannot charge for services.

The aircraft you can fly is of the category airplane, and the class single engine land. (Categories include airplane, rotorcraft, glider, LTA, and powered-lift. Classes include AIRPLANE single/multi engine land/sea ROTOCRAFT helicopter, gyroplane LTA airship, balloon). Aircraft type can also be included, but apparently is often not included in small airplanes.
When aircraft are certified (not pilots, as explained above), they have their own set of catagories which defines their intended use.
Normal/Utility – These two catagories are common for small and training airplanes, some are certified in both catagories depending on how they are loaded. Utility airplanes can just handle more stresses than normal.
Acrobatic airplanes have few operating limitations, and must be able to withstand the highest stresses.
Commuter airplanes are limited to 19 seats and 19,000 pounds.
Transport airplanes are usually large aircraft that exceed one of the above limitations.
Restricted airplanes are special purpose ones like spray planes and fire fighting ones.
Limited airplanes are military craft which can be used for limited purposes in civil aviation.
Provisional airplanes are those which are new and have not met requirements for certification, but can be used for some purposes.
Experimental planes are just that.
The private pilot certificate does not expire, but to act as PIC you must undergo a flight review every 2 years.
The flight review is administered by a CFI and is at least 1 hour ground instruction and 1 hour flight instruction. It tests you knowledge of regulations and procedures, and your proficiency in pilot operations and maneuvers.
If you pass the flight review you logbook is endorsed by the CFI.

To carry passengers you must have made at least 3 takeoffs and landings in the same catagory and class plane within the last 90 days.

Next section: Aviation Opportunities
"Well, you pretty much answered your own question. What else, exactly, do you want to know?"
How did I answer my own question? What I want to know is what I should know that isn't already presented.
I mean, if I already knew what I wanted to know, I wouldn't need to know it!

Well, you pretty much answered your own question. What else, exactly, do you want to know?

Comments

2 Responses to “Can you review this summary of things to know about private pilot training and certification? It's short.?”

  1. tarkill68 on October 12th, 2008 8:00 am

    Well, you pretty much answered your own question. What else, exactly, do you want to know?
    References :

  2. fireman_justin on October 12th, 2008 8:28 am

    There are mountains of knowledge that go in to getting a private pilot cert. Let's also not forget the medical exam you must take. To find out exactly all you need to know, go buy some training material… Sportys Pilot Shop (www.sportys.com) is a great place to start. You might also try the Aircraft Owner & Pilots Association (www.aopa.org) – they have tons of info as well.
    References :

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