On a good day, would a Cessna make it from Page, Arizona to Prescott, Arizona without refueling?

October 16, 2008

There is a vast amount of land between the two that is above 7000' and even higher passes.
Would that prove challenging for a Cessna 150? Just the distance between the two is close to the range of a 150.

After I finish my license I want to get an airplane so I can visit my best friend in Prescott more often. However, I cannot afford a plane much over $20,000. If the Cessna 150 can make it, I would be quite happy with that.

You're going to be very close to needing fuel when you make the trip non-stop. Until you get to know your particular aircraft, I'm like the guy that said make a stop for fuel the first few times you make the trip. The 150 has a service ceiling of 14,000 and will climb to 10,000 without any problem, but it takes a while. Good thing is you can do a lot of coasting coming back down. Try to get an egt if your plane doesn't already have one. That can really help with proper leaning of the mixture on your trip.

One other thing: Be sure to keep your altimeter set to the correct value during your high altitude phases. Set the Kohlsman wrong, or forget to set it, and you could be quite a bit lower than the altimeter shows.

Comments

6 Responses to “On a good day, would a Cessna make it from Page, Arizona to Prescott, Arizona without refueling?”

  1. stephenn1998 on October 16th, 2008 1:22 pm

    What about a 172 or maybe you can find a version of the 150 with larger tanks. I haven't done much flying but when I was in ND I flew with my friend from Grand Forks to Minot a few times in a 172, (which I looked up and is approx the same distance from Page to Prescott.) and he liked to fly at 8000' + and we had plenty of fuel. upon landing.
    References :

  2. fighterace26 on October 16th, 2008 1:29 pm

    buy the 150 and make a fuel stop,

    don't forget FAA regs about fuel reserves,

    fuel exhaustion is the #1 killer in general aviation.

    be prepared because that 20K only buys the plane, then you can expect to spend 3-5K a year for expenses annual, hangar, repairs, insurance, etc,
    References :
    Pilot

  3. ALOPILOT on October 16th, 2008 1:48 pm

    On a good day you could probobly make it, but be careful with that, with the desert terrain and the high density altitude that you get down there in arizona you may have some trouble with it, the bottom line is that you will have to plan a fuel stop the first few times you do it, calculate burn, and then decide if you would have made it, its not worth the risk of going empty… its fuel, your gunna hafta buy it anyway, weither you buy it once or twice along the way is up to you, your plane, and the weather… recommend the 172 however if you get a chance… very nice airplane with plenty of range to make it without a stop…
    References :

  4. rayk469 on October 16th, 2008 2:04 pm

    You're going to be very close to needing fuel when you make the trip non-stop. Until you get to know your particular aircraft, I'm like the guy that said make a stop for fuel the first few times you make the trip. The 150 has a service ceiling of 14,000 and will climb to 10,000 without any problem, but it takes a while. Good thing is you can do a lot of coasting coming back down. Try to get an egt if your plane doesn't already have one. That can really help with proper leaning of the mixture on your trip.

    One other thing: Be sure to keep your altimeter set to the correct value during your high altitude phases. Set the Kohlsman wrong, or forget to set it, and you could be quite a bit lower than the altimeter shows.
    References :

  5. Leopold on October 16th, 2008 2:16 pm

    I got my ticket in a 150 with a climb prop, and i found it difficult to get above 8000 feet. I climbed to 9,500 ft, and it took nearly 25 minutes. Rate of climb after 5000 feet dropped dramatically. Look at a 172, they would be much better at the trip than a 150, and only a little more fuel burn…
    References :
    Private Pilot

  6. sfsfan1 on October 16th, 2008 3:00 pm

    The distance between Love Field in Prescott and Page Municipal Airport is 144.3 nautical miles. That would take slightly more than an hour and a half. The highest terrain on the direct route between these airports is 8507 feet above mean sea level. A Cessna 150 would have no problem making this flight non-stop, with plenty of fuel remaining. Although a 172 is faster and slightly more comfortable, the 150 is far cheaper to own and operate in about every way. Good luck with your license.
    References :
    http://www.landings.com
    '74 Cessna 150L Owner's Manual

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