Aviation News Today: Headlines 09.12.08

December 29, 2008

Peters- New Steps to Improve FAA’s Safety Program
House Hearing on the Passenger Watchlist
FAA Awards Controller Training Contract to Raytheon
Cargo radiation scanning starts at Dulles
DOT Awards Small Community Air Service Grants
TSA Issues Travel Advisory for Venezuela
AA says US capacity reductions permanent
UA Refutes Bankruptcy Report
DHL to pay $260 mln in severance
Continental Cuts Pilots
Alaska Airlines Equips Fleet with Runway Awareness Technology:
Sensis Multilateration System Operational At London Gatwick
Continental to Launch 3RD Daily NY-Heathrow Flight
Continental Plans New Routes
Horizon Links Sacramento to Santa Barbara
Air Canada to offer in-flight Internet service

Duration : 0:9:26

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Cessna 152 Aerobatics

December 29, 2008

Aileron rolls, barrell rolls, snap rolls, loop, Cuban 8, avalanche, and 6 turn spin in a Cessna 152 Aerobat

Duration : 0:9:46

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Is the ignition tumbler lock supposed to pop out on a Cessna 172?

December 29, 2008

It was my first time to fly a small airplane. The flight instructor told me to turn it off and take out the key for a moment to let the starter cool off and let the avgas evaporate. "Hung Start". The tumbler for the magneto switch/lock came out when I pulled the key out! The instructor then fumbled with it to put it back in and we were able to do the half hour flight. Is that part supposed to come out so easily? What holds it in? Is it safe? Is that airworthy? Needless to say I don't feel very confident about Cesnnas after this experience. It was a 1990's model too with the 180 hp fuel injection. So it was not that old. My car is older then that airplane. I don't think that flight training school is maintaining their airplanes very well. On the other hand, if that's the case, I would think the FAA would shut them down because they inspect everything.

What do you guys make of this?

That is a fault in the manufacturing of the switch and not the fault of flight school or Cessna

The switch was not made by cessna as matter of fact it is made by a vendor who supplies the same FAA approved switches to several aircraft manufacturers. It was defective and you were the lucky one who had this happen to. But look at the bright things like this only happen on the ground.

Is the ignition tumbler lock supposed to pop out on a Cessna 172?

December 29, 2008

It was my first time to fly a small airplane. The flight instructor told me to turn it off and take out the key for a moment to let the starter cool off and let the avgas evaporate. "Hung Start". The tumbler for the magneto switch/lock came out when I pulled the key out! The instructor then fumbled with it to put it back in and we were able to do the half hour flight. Is that part supposed to come out so easily? What holds it in? Is it safe? Is that airworthy? Needless to say I don't feel very confident about Cesnnas after this experience. It was a 1990's model too with the 180 hp fuel injection. So it was not that old. My car is older then that airplane. I don't think that flight training school is maintaining their airplanes very well. On the other hand, if that's the case, I would think the FAA would shut them down because they inspect everything.

What do you guys make of this?

That is a fault in the manufacturing of the switch and not the fault of flight school or Cessna

The switch was not made by cessna as matter of fact it is made by a vendor who supplies the same FAA approved switches to several aircraft manufacturers. It was defective and you were the lucky one who had this happen to. But look at the bright things like this only happen on the ground.

Is the ignition tumbler lock supposed to pop out on a Cessna 172?

December 29, 2008

It was my first time to fly a small airplane. The flight instructor told me to turn it off and take out the key for a moment to let the starter cool off and let the avgas evaporate. "Hung Start". The tumbler for the magneto switch/lock came out when I pulled the key out! The instructor then fumbled with it to put it back in and we were able to do the half hour flight. Is that part supposed to come out so easily? What holds it in? Is it safe? Is that airworthy? Needless to say I don't feel very confident about Cesnnas after this experience. It was a 1990's model too with the 180 hp fuel injection. So it was not that old. My car is older then that airplane. I don't think that flight training school is maintaining their airplanes very well. On the other hand, if that's the case, I would think the FAA would shut them down because they inspect everything.

What do you guys make of this?

That is a fault in the manufacturing of the switch and not the fault of flight school or Cessna

The switch was not made by cessna as matter of fact it is made by a vendor who supplies the same FAA approved switches to several aircraft manufacturers. It was defective and you were the lucky one who had this happen to. But look at the bright things like this only happen on the ground.