How was this guy successful at suing Air Canada?

January 31, 2009

So he's deaf and blind, so they wouldn't let him fly without an attendant. He successfully sues the company for $10,000 for discrimination.

http://www.google.com/hostednews/canadianpress/article/ALeqM5hTb2mmY-8eNMeZjyv8GiwVpIbUSQ

What the heck??? How are the flight attendants supposed to communicate to him? How would he know if the captain came on the PA and said brace for impact? How would he know how to get out of the plane in an emergency? What would he do if there was an unscheduled diversion to another airport?

I don't get it! There's countless variables that he would need special attention for! Travelling by plane is NOT like travelling by bus. Not allowing him to fly unaccompanied is safety related, for himself and for the company. Anything related to safety shouldn't be scrutinized!

Doesn't the FAA have a requirement that all passengers be informed of certain events? Without an attendant or someone trained to communicate to the deaf and blind then there's no way for the crew to inform this man. How can the company remain lawful if they have no way to communicate information to him?
Small correction: an airline operating in Canada would follow the Canadian Air Regulations (CARs) issued by Transport Canada, not the FAA. Similar rules still apply though.

The decision by the Human Rights Tribunal really doesn't address the safety issue, but the basic human right.

Whether or not he can fly unaccompanied was never settled. What was decided is that Air Canada needed to assess his disability to make the decision – which it did not. They essentially assumed all disabled persons should be treated the same, not as individuals.

How was this guy successful at suing Air Canada?

January 31, 2009

So he's deaf and blind, so they wouldn't let him fly without an attendant. He successfully sues the company for $10,000 for discrimination.

http://www.google.com/hostednews/canadianpress/article/ALeqM5hTb2mmY-8eNMeZjyv8GiwVpIbUSQ

What the heck??? How are the flight attendants supposed to communicate to him? How would he know if the captain came on the PA and said brace for impact? How would he know how to get out of the plane in an emergency? What would he do if there was an unscheduled diversion to another airport?

I don't get it! There's countless variables that he would need special attention for! Travelling by plane is NOT like travelling by bus. Not allowing him to fly unaccompanied is safety related, for himself and for the company. Anything related to safety shouldn't be scrutinized!

Doesn't the FAA have a requirement that all passengers be informed of certain events? Without an attendant or someone trained to communicate to the deaf and blind then there's no way for the crew to inform this man. How can the company remain lawful if they have no way to communicate information to him?
Small correction: an airline operating in Canada would follow the Canadian Air Regulations (CARs) issued by Transport Canada, not the FAA. Similar rules still apply though.

The decision by the Human Rights Tribunal really doesn't address the safety issue, but the basic human right.

Whether or not he can fly unaccompanied was never settled. What was decided is that Air Canada needed to assess his disability to make the decision – which it did not. They essentially assumed all disabled persons should be treated the same, not as individuals.

How was this guy successful at suing Air Canada?

January 31, 2009

So he's deaf and blind, so they wouldn't let him fly without an attendant. He successfully sues the company for $10,000 for discrimination.

http://www.google.com/hostednews/canadianpress/article/ALeqM5hTb2mmY-8eNMeZjyv8GiwVpIbUSQ

What the heck??? How are the flight attendants supposed to communicate to him? How would he know if the captain came on the PA and said brace for impact? How would he know how to get out of the plane in an emergency? What would he do if there was an unscheduled diversion to another airport?

I don't get it! There's countless variables that he would need special attention for! Travelling by plane is NOT like travelling by bus. Not allowing him to fly unaccompanied is safety related, for himself and for the company. Anything related to safety shouldn't be scrutinized!

Doesn't the FAA have a requirement that all passengers be informed of certain events? Without an attendant or someone trained to communicate to the deaf and blind then there's no way for the crew to inform this man. How can the company remain lawful if they have no way to communicate information to him?
Small correction: an airline operating in Canada would follow the Canadian Air Regulations (CARs) issued by Transport Canada, not the FAA. Similar rules still apply though.

The decision by the Human Rights Tribunal really doesn't address the safety issue, but the basic human right.

Whether or not he can fly unaccompanied was never settled. What was decided is that Air Canada needed to assess his disability to make the decision – which it did not. They essentially assumed all disabled persons should be treated the same, not as individuals.

Could a Cessna land on an aircraft carrier?

January 27, 2009

Hi. I'm a screenwriter and I'm working on a film in which a light aircraft such as a Cessna needs to land on an aircraft carrier at sea. I'd like to know if this is at all possible and if so, is there any emergency situation in which it would be preferable to land on an aircraft carrier rather than ditch into the sea? Thanks for your help!

If it was a bona fide emergency the captain might just order the crash nets up and let you take your chances. I'm sure a crash net could stop a Cessna.

The more likely scenario would be that you would be '"encouraged"' to ditch the aircraft in the pond and they would send the rescue divers out after you. I'm sure the Navy has rules about letting civilian pilots damage their boats whilst crashing into their decks.

Could a Cessna land on an aircraft carrier?

January 27, 2009

Hi. I'm a screenwriter and I'm working on a film in which a light aircraft such as a Cessna needs to land on an aircraft carrier at sea. I'd like to know if this is at all possible and if so, is there any emergency situation in which it would be preferable to land on an aircraft carrier rather than ditch into the sea? Thanks for your help!

If it was a bona fide emergency the captain might just order the crash nets up and let you take your chances. I'm sure a crash net could stop a Cessna.

The more likely scenario would be that you would be '"encouraged"' to ditch the aircraft in the pond and they would send the rescue divers out after you. I'm sure the Navy has rules about letting civilian pilots damage their boats whilst crashing into their decks.

Could a Cessna land on an aircraft carrier?

January 27, 2009

Hi. I'm a screenwriter and I'm working on a film in which a light aircraft such as a Cessna needs to land on an aircraft carrier at sea. I'd like to know if this is at all possible and if so, is there any emergency situation in which it would be preferable to land on an aircraft carrier rather than ditch into the sea? Thanks for your help!

If it was a bona fide emergency the captain might just order the crash nets up and let you take your chances. I'm sure a crash net could stop a Cessna.

The more likely scenario would be that you would be '"encouraged"' to ditch the aircraft in the pond and they would send the rescue divers out after you. I'm sure the Navy has rules about letting civilian pilots damage their boats whilst crashing into their decks.

Hidden Danger – Part 2

January 24, 2009

In 1991, moments from landing, United Airlines 585 starts spinning out of control and falls out of the sky at 450 kilometers per hour. Everyone on board is killed. In ten violent seconds, the crash site has become one of the most mysterious air disasters in aviation history.

Almost two years after the crash, the NTSB had studied the crew, the weather, the rudder, and thousands of other pieces of evidence — but they can’t solve the mystery. For only the fourth time in its history, the NTSB release a report stating the cause of the crash of flight 585 was undetermined.

On September 7, 1994, a year after the report on Flight 585 is released, the killer strikes again. Another 737 — this time US Air 427 — crashes near Pittsburg. All 132 passengers and crew are killed. Investigators begin to quickly see some striking similarities between US Air 427 — and the unsolved case of United 585.

But, like the earlier accident, investigators have plenty of theories, but can’t nail down a cause. With two crashes just a few years apart, serious questions are now being raised about the safety of 737s around the world. Billions of dollars, perhaps the airline industry itself, are at risk. Investigators need a break in the case, and fast.

It’s only when another 737 has a similar problem — but doesn’t crash — that investigators crack the case open. The pilot of Eastwind 517, is on final approach into Richmond Virginia when, without warning, his 737 twice rolls sharply to the right. The pilot is able to recover, and land the plane safely. NTSB investigators quickly determine that what happened on board Eastwind 517 is alarmingly similar to events on flights 427 and 585. The pilot’s testimony leads investigators to zero in on the 737’s rudder controls. After a series of grueling tests, investigators discover that a key piece of equipment — a small hydraulic valve – jams and then functions in reverse under the right circumstances. It means that any time a pilot tried to correct a roll over, by pushing on the rudder, the rudder might turn in the opposite direction, causing a fatal accident.

In the aftermath of the investigation, sweeping changes were made to improve the safety of the 737 — and the entire aviation industry. New training protocols were designed to help pilots react to unusual in-flight events, upset recoveries and advanced maneuver training. The FAA also directed Boeing to redesign the rudder’s dual servo valve to eliminate the potential for reversal. Boeing spent more than a billion dollars to replace the valves on thousands of 737’s around the world.

Duration : 0:9:57

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Money Minute: Citigroup, Cessna, Oil

January 24, 2009

Citigroup is hammering out a deal to sell the bulk of its retail brokerage to Morgan Stanley. The AP’s Mark Hamrick reports. (Jan. 12)

Duration : 0:0:52

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Sporty’s So You Want to Fly Helicopters

January 20, 2009

This remake of Sporty’s very first video production brings helicopter flight into your living room like you’ve never seen before. Completely redesigned with vivid 3D animations and all new exciting in-flight video, this program will thoroughly prepare you for the challenges of rotary-wing flight and help you master the aerodynamic concepts with ease. In addition to covering all the specific information needed to pass the helicopter portion of the FAA Private Pilot exam, you will also be mentally prepared for your flight lessons. This comprehensive program includes preflight, basics of flight, hovering, taxiing, takeoffs and landings, maneuvers, weight and balance, autorotation, emergency procedures, systems and components, FARs and more. We’ll also cover the fundamentals of helicopter navigation and cross-helicopters, such as the Robinson R22 and R44, Schweizer 269, and the Bell 206 Jetranger. After viewing this program, you’ll know exactly what it takes to safely and proficiently fly a helicopter and open up a whole other world of powered flight. Approx. 89 min.

Duration : 0:4:26

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My Free Carenado Cessna and Lukla Airport VNLK Legal Freeware FS2004

January 20, 2009

Don’t have the payware stuff? I found a nice freeware Cessna 152 from Carenado, and Lukla Airport VNLK freeware scenery and had a great time at one of the world’s most challenging airports located in Nepal.

The Cessna 152 is originally for FS2000 and FS2002 and was downloaded from Carenado, and the Lukla V3 scenery is for FS2002, downloaded from Avsim, and they both work nicely in FS2004. I added the autopilot and DME to the Cessna panel.

Nice comments and ratings for my efforts to make the video and share this info are welcome.

Duration : 0:5:7

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