Would it be possible to get my pilots license in 5-6 weeks under the following circumstances?

February 18, 2009

I am writing this in February and am 16 at the time. I have been studying everything in Gleims Private Pilots written test prep book for the past 8 months

I have really studied hard making sure I know everything perfectly and I have taken the FAA knowledge test and I got a 100 on it. I know a great deal about airplanes from hundreds of hours in the sim over years so I know how one handles. I also have 5 hours of training so far.

My plan was as follows: I currently live in Connecticut and this summer I will be living with my grandparents in North Carolina for 5-6 weeks doing nothing but flying. (its half the price down there) I will have absolutely no other commitments except flight training.

I was planning on flying 1.5-2 hours a day 6 days a week. I have already found an instructor that would be willing to work with me and I have taken a lesson with him before and liked him. He thinks I can do it.

During the time that I am not at the airport I will be studying from various flying books that I will be ordering off of sportys. (I will have tons of free time).

From now until July when I go down there, I will also be studying from books taking as much knowledge as I can in.

So I want to hear someone else's opinion on whether or not you think I can do this.

Thanks

assume you mean for a private pilot. Based on a couple of factors, you might have some hurdles. One being your age. You cannot get a pilots license at 16. FAA says you must be 17. The hours might be tight, but you may be able to do it. If you fly a solid 12 hours a week, you could hit the 40 hours of training time required.

I wish you luck. Enjoy it!

The private pilot certificate is the certificate held by the majority of active pilots. It allows command of any aircraft (subject to appropriate ratings) for any non-commercial purpose, and gives almost unlimited authority to fly under visual flight rules (VFR). Passengers may be carried and flight in furtherance of a business is permitted; however, a private pilot may not be compensated in any way for services as a pilot, although passengers can pay a pro rata share of flight expenses, such as fuel or rental costs. Private pilots may also operate charity flights, subject to certain restrictions, and may participate in similar activities, such as Angel Flight.

The requirements to obtain a private pilot certificate for "airplane, single-engine, land", or ASEL, (which is the most common certificate) are:[6]

Be at least 17 years old
Be able to read, speak, and write the English language
Obtain at least a third class medical certificate from an Aviation Medical Examiner
Pass a computerized aeronautical knowledge test
Accumulate and log a specified amount of training and experience, including the following:
If training under Part 61, experience requirements are specified in Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations section 61.109 including at least 40 hours of piloting time including 20 hours of flight with an instructor and 10 hours of solo flight, and other requirements including "cross-country", 10 hours of solo (i.e., by yourself) flight time in an airplane, including at least
Solo requirements:
5 hours of solo cross-country time
One solo cross-country flight of at least 150 NM total distance, with full-stop landings at a minimum of three points and with one segment of the flight consisting of a straight-line distance of at least 50 NM between the takeoff and landing locations
Three solo takeoffs and landings to a full stop at an airport with an operating control tower.
Night requirements:
3 hours of night flight training
One cross-country flight of over 100 nautical miles (190 km) total distance
10 takeoffs and 10 landings to a full stop (with each landing involving a flight in the traffic pattern) at an airport
3 hours of flight training on the control and maneuvering solely by reference to instruments
If training under Part 141, at least 35 hours of piloting time including 20 hours with an instructor and 5 hours of solo flight, and other requirements including cross-country and night flights
Pass an oral test and flight test administered by an FAA inspector, FAA-designated examiner, or authorized check instructor (Part 141 only)

Comments

3 Responses to “Would it be possible to get my pilots license in 5-6 weeks under the following circumstances?”

  1. Mr. Goodkat on February 18th, 2009 10:50 pm

    assume you mean for a private pilot. Based on a couple of factors, you might have some hurdles. One being your age. You cannot get a pilots license at 16. FAA says you must be 17. The hours might be tight, but you may be able to do it. If you fly a solid 12 hours a week, you could hit the 40 hours of training time required.

    I wish you luck. Enjoy it!

    The private pilot certificate is the certificate held by the majority of active pilots. It allows command of any aircraft (subject to appropriate ratings) for any non-commercial purpose, and gives almost unlimited authority to fly under visual flight rules (VFR). Passengers may be carried and flight in furtherance of a business is permitted; however, a private pilot may not be compensated in any way for services as a pilot, although passengers can pay a pro rata share of flight expenses, such as fuel or rental costs. Private pilots may also operate charity flights, subject to certain restrictions, and may participate in similar activities, such as Angel Flight.

    The requirements to obtain a private pilot certificate for "airplane, single-engine, land", or ASEL, (which is the most common certificate) are:[6]

    Be at least 17 years old
    Be able to read, speak, and write the English language
    Obtain at least a third class medical certificate from an Aviation Medical Examiner
    Pass a computerized aeronautical knowledge test
    Accumulate and log a specified amount of training and experience, including the following:
    If training under Part 61, experience requirements are specified in Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations section 61.109 including at least 40 hours of piloting time including 20 hours of flight with an instructor and 10 hours of solo flight, and other requirements including "cross-country", 10 hours of solo (i.e., by yourself) flight time in an airplane, including at least
    Solo requirements:
    5 hours of solo cross-country time
    One solo cross-country flight of at least 150 NM total distance, with full-stop landings at a minimum of three points and with one segment of the flight consisting of a straight-line distance of at least 50 NM between the takeoff and landing locations
    Three solo takeoffs and landings to a full stop at an airport with an operating control tower.
    Night requirements:
    3 hours of night flight training
    One cross-country flight of over 100 nautical miles (190 km) total distance
    10 takeoffs and 10 landings to a full stop (with each landing involving a flight in the traffic pattern) at an airport
    3 hours of flight training on the control and maneuvering solely by reference to instruments
    If training under Part 141, at least 35 hours of piloting time including 20 hours with an instructor and 5 hours of solo flight, and other requirements including cross-country and night flights
    Pass an oral test and flight test administered by an FAA inspector, FAA-designated examiner, or authorized check instructor (Part 141 only)
    References :

  2. Mike on February 18th, 2009 11:28 pm

    Sure of course you can! my instructor teaches an advanced course which teaches people in 14 days but of course thats about 6 hours a day 6 days a week.

    Personally i have about 23 hours and will be going solo next Saturday but i am only turning 16 this upcoming Sunday so i still have to wait a year to get my ppl
    References :

  3. ski_pil0t on February 18th, 2009 11:49 pm

    Honestly, you sound organised, conscientious and hardworking. If you have the finances to fly as frequently as you're planning to, and if you can keep up with the learning curve, I don't see why not. You sure don't seem like the kind to skip homework.

    There's one thing I'd recommend you be aware of, and that is the fact that virtually everyone plateaus at some point or gets stuck on one issue or another. So, factor in at least 10 extra hours for whatever your bugbear will prove to be. Other than that, you come across as having the goods to make this happen. Best of luck!
    References :

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