What are the limits of the Cessna 172 and the 182?

July 27, 2009

Ok I just joined a flying club that rents cessna 172’s and an 182. What are the operational limits??? Like can they barrel role or loop?? just curious.

Neither of these aircraft are designed for any kind of aerobatics. You will most probably find a placard in the cabin that says something about intentional spins being prohibited.

Are you qualified to do aerobatic flying? You need to find an instructor who is, and a plane that is designed for the purpose.

If you do any aerobatic flying in a plane not certified for the job then you will be kicked out of the flying club very quickly, if you don’t kill yourself first.

Comments

6 Responses to “What are the limits of the Cessna 172 and the 182?”

  1. calnickel on July 27th, 2009 10:11 pm

    No, they cannot do any inverted maneuvers legally.

    The 172 can do spins, chandelles, lazy eights, and wing overs in the utility category; but nothing that exceeds a 90 degree angle of bank.

    Don’t do any maneuver that you haven’t been trained to do.
    References :

  2. Techwing on July 27th, 2009 10:38 pm

    Neither aircraft is certified for aerobatics. Be sure to tell the flying club of your plans, as they may not be in favor of you pushing the aircraft to its operational limits. Thrill-seeking pilots kill themselves a lot, and they take expensive aircraft with them.

    If you want to do aerobatics, get instruction in that specifically from a qualified instructor, in an aircraft built specifically for that purpose.
    References :

  3. T.J. on July 27th, 2009 11:18 pm

    Read the POH, as you should have done already if you plan on flying these aircraft. Then you will know the operational limits of the aircraft. Any maneuver exceeding 60 degrees of bank or 30 degrees nose up or down attitude requires a parachute. Loops are out of the question and so are barrel rolls unless you happen to be Bob Hoover. Spins are allowed in the 172 provided you load the aircraft correctly, but spins are prohibited in the 182.
    If you want to do aerobatics, there are places you can go to get instruction in them in aircraft that are certified to perform them. Cessna are not designed for aerobatics, nor are they any good at doing them so don’t waste your time and possibly your life.
    References :

  4. Ren on July 27th, 2009 11:34 pm

    Yeah I actually just got back from flying a 172 and i was trying to mess around just a little bit. Within the operating limits though I promise you that. But i was thinking the thought of the extreme lack of power that they have. So its pretty hard to do anything to jeperadize it…

    But still the cessna is not redundant in aerobatics what so ever so conduct at your own risk…

  5. John p on July 28th, 2009 12:05 am

    Neither of these aircraft are designed for any kind of aerobatics. You will most probably find a placard in the cabin that says something about intentional spins being prohibited.

    Are you qualified to do aerobatic flying? You need to find an instructor who is, and a plane that is designed for the purpose.

    If you do any aerobatic flying in a plane not certified for the job then you will be kicked out of the flying club very quickly, if you don’t kill yourself first.
    References :
    Aircraft Engineer

  6. Jason on August 12th, 2009 10:01 pm

    I find it highly unlikely you are a pilot at all. Nobody I have ever flown with would ask “Like can they barrel role or loop?? just curious”

    You would know they are not designed for this. I’m sure if you were ever in a spin you would soil yourself and cry rather then retard the throttle, neutralize the ailerons, and apply corrective ruder pressure. Have fun pretending to be a pilot and stick to the RC planes I’m sure you DO fly.

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