What is the best way to memorize FAA regs and aeronautical knowledge?

August 12, 2009

No doubt flying itself is very fun however when it get’s to it there is quite a bit of work to be done. For you certified pilots out there I am at the point on my flight training where it is based strictly on aeronautical knowledge and FAA regs but I am having a difficult time memorizing them. Can anyone please make a suggestion?

Regards

It depends on what specifically you’re trying to learn, but there are a few different ways. Acronyms are a good way to learn things like required equipment and other long lists. Make a word with the first letters of all the words then fill it in. If you need to memorize something like airspace visibility and cloud clearances, you can either draw a picture of the airspaces or just list them. There are some other tricks, if you have something specifically you need to learn, feel free to email me.

The key to learning any regulation is repetition and practical application. Whenever I would got bored in class I would list in my notebook what all was needed for legal flight: documents, currency, equipment, etc. For other regulations, just read them a couple times a day for a few days. After a while, you’ll remember them. My instructor also suggested tabbing my FAR/AIM for certain regulations. This can help you find a regulation quickly.

Comments

6 Responses to “What is the best way to memorize FAA regs and aeronautical knowledge?”

  1. cris_sindac on August 12th, 2009 6:12 am

    FAA regulations is not necessary to memorize but you must know on how to use that book
    References :

  2. Techwing on August 12th, 2009 6:49 am

    You don’t have to memorize everything, but you need to know the answers to practical questions that could conceivably arise in flight. For example, you need to know that your speed has to stay below 250 KIAS when you are below 10,000 feet, and you should know the only exception to that (when the safety of your flight requires a higher speed), but you don’t necessarily need to know the complete text of the regulation that requires this, or the section of the regulation.

    In general, the more you use or reference information you’ve encountered, the more you’ll memorize it. Eventually you’ll have enough of the right information committed to memory to pass the exams. But you don’t have to memorize everything.
    References :

  3. T.J. on August 12th, 2009 7:29 am

    It depends on what specifically you’re trying to learn, but there are a few different ways. Acronyms are a good way to learn things like required equipment and other long lists. Make a word with the first letters of all the words then fill it in. If you need to memorize something like airspace visibility and cloud clearances, you can either draw a picture of the airspaces or just list them. There are some other tricks, if you have something specifically you need to learn, feel free to email me.

    The key to learning any regulation is repetition and practical application. Whenever I would got bored in class I would list in my notebook what all was needed for legal flight: documents, currency, equipment, etc. For other regulations, just read them a couple times a day for a few days. After a while, you’ll remember them. My instructor also suggested tabbing my FAR/AIM for certain regulations. This can help you find a regulation quickly.
    References :

  4. wcowell2000 on August 12th, 2009 7:52 am

    Your instructor should point out what you need to know.
    References :

  5. Easygo on August 12th, 2009 8:29 am

    I am an x controller and we had much to memorize. We found the best way was to set in a group and the questions would rotate around. If you can’t find anyone that needs to learn your stuff also just have a friend ask you the questions. May work just as well. Lee
    References :

  6. Rob G on August 12th, 2009 8:49 am

    I never bothered trying to memorize FAA regulations (other than what would have been required to pass a certain test/checkride). That’s why they publish them in books and have a website where you can look it up. The more important thing is to know where to find the answer and not to have it memorized.
    References :
    ex airline pilot

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