Cessna 152A Aerobatics

September 1, 2009

Taking a Cessna 152A up for some aerobatics at Jandakot, trying out everything possible in its performance envelope:

Aileron rolls
Barrell Rolls
Cuban-8s
Snap Rolls
Vertical Rolls
Immelmans
Spins
Stall Turns
Split-S’,
etc.

Probably the hardest manouevers to pull off are the vertical rolls and stall turns. They require the adoption of the exact vertical attitude quickly ‘cos the 152s engine won’t fight gravity for longer than a second 🙁

I need more practice but it’s a lot of fun!

Duration : 0:6:31


Comments

22 Responses to “Cessna 152A Aerobatics”

  1. pbeer on September 1st, 2009 4:11 am

    i think joining a …
    i think joining a flying club would be easier to be honest, that abolishes landing charges

  2. Automuse on September 1st, 2009 4:11 am

    The aircraft is …
    The aircraft is charged per tenth of an hour (VDO time), On top of that, there are landing charges at the airport, and Goods&Services Tax if it’ is a private flight.

    The total cost for an hours flight for me (a typical sortie) works out to be about AU$170.

  3. charliedip on September 1st, 2009 4:11 am

    That’s what I …
    That’s what I figured, how much did this cessna 152A cost to rent for the day?

  4. Automuse on September 1st, 2009 4:11 am

    I wish I owned a …
    I wish I owned a plane, but will have to make do with renting until I can afford one!

  5. charliedip on September 1st, 2009 4:11 am

    5/5 *’s Did you …
    5/5 *’s Did you rent, or do you own it?

  6. ferociousfrankie on September 1st, 2009 4:11 am

    LMAO! I like the …
    LMAO! I like the stall indicator’s sound. Pure Cessna!

  7. mavukotich82 on September 1st, 2009 4:11 am

    i suggest you …
    i suggest you forget what you read in ur text book because your quoting theory for the most part. when u have an instructor rating with aerobatics approval like i do u’ll find out quickly that what u’ve learnt so far is only the tip of the iceberg. i’m still learning…everyday

  8. Automuse on September 1st, 2009 4:11 am

    Try pulling …
    Try pulling vertical from an 80kt cruise in a Cessna 152 and see what happens then 😉 In straight and level there is a few degrees AoA, in perfect vertical there is zero AoA, but during the pull up from one to the other the AoA INCREASES – and if you don’t have the speed it’ll approach critical AoA. Thats why you don’t do steep turns at slow speeds, thats why the entry speed for stall turns is around 115kts, and for loops its around 125kts – so yes, you do need airspeed to get vertical. P+A=P

  9. mavukotich82 on September 1st, 2009 4:11 am

    next time you take …
    next time you take WIY start a vertical climb and just before it tail-slides try a stall turn. if you time it right u’ll very quickly find out that it doesn’t always react the way you want it 2 because in that situation the rudder isn’t all that effective and to put it simply, ur just a passenger until the weight takes over and the nose is pointing down. good fun!

  10. mavukotich82 on September 1st, 2009 4:11 am

    if WIY had enough …
    if WIY had enough thrust (which i know it doesn’t because i fly it every day) it would be absolutely possible to climb vertically from the point of rotation during take off to altitude. the only thing keeping you going up is thrust, that is how a rocket works.

  11. mavukotich82 on September 1st, 2009 4:11 am

    almost. the …
    almost. the difference between the AoA during straight and level and a vertical climb can basically be thought of as equal because the relative airflow is coming from the same direction relative to aerofoil. airspeed has nothing to do with ‘going vertical’.

  12. Automuse on September 1st, 2009 4:11 am

    Thats right, but to …
    Thats right, but to get vert you’ll need a fair dose of speed – otherwise the relative airflow will change too quickly and you will exceed the stall AoA. Once you get vertical though you’ll be at zero AoA, and the only thing keeping you going up is your momentum (hence the need for an entry speed) and whatever power your engine can muster (C152 = not much!). The slipstream from the engine and a low remaining speed gives the rudder just enough authority to turn yourself back towards the ground.

  13. mavukotich82 on September 1st, 2009 4:11 am

    got nothing 2 do …
    got nothing 2 do with airspeed, u could be perfectly vertical maintaining 1 knot in nil wind and the aircraft won’t stall as long as you haven’t exceeded the critical AoA

  14. sas345 on September 1st, 2009 4:11 am

    pretty neat. im in …
    pretty neat. im in Air Cadets. last time i went flyin i had this beserk RAF guy who did what felt like 20 spins. I couldnt beleive it when he asked me to try at recover it. im only 14.

  15. hasjt on September 1st, 2009 4:11 am

    Thanks sir!
    Thanks sir!

  16. Automuse on September 1st, 2009 4:11 am

    Hasjt,

    The …
    Hasjt,

    The standard factory C152 is NOT aerobatic…but most flying schools buy the C152A Aerobat version. As long as the flight manual says its aerobatic, you can do any of these manouevers.

    As for the G-forces, the rolls are all under 2G, the loops/roll-off-the-top are about 3.5G, and I’ve pulled 5G in the Split-S – ie all within limits.

    Be very careful not to enter snap rolls above 70kts, and watch your speed when vertical.

    Oh and please don’t try without an aerobatic rating!

  17. hasjt on September 1st, 2009 4:11 am

    Dear Automuse! can …
    Dear Automuse! can i do these formations with standart c152?????? how many G forces was???

  18. kfsn1904 on September 1st, 2009 4:11 am

    Whow – would be fun …
    Whow – would be fun flying with him.

  19. deepfryd on September 1st, 2009 4:11 am

    ah, that’s the …
    ah, that’s the trick. Keep the speed up before either of the wings stall. No, I won’t be trying this one out anytime soon, my instructor would go beserk on me 😉

  20. Automuse on September 1st, 2009 4:11 am

    Stall Turn:
    * Dive …

    Stall Turn:
    * Dive to entry speed
    * Pull up fairly hard, go to full power and establish perfect vertical
    * When speed decays, boot in full rudder and some opposite aileron to keep the turn co-ordinated.
    * Reduce power on the swing back down to prevent overspeeding

    The aircraft won’t stall or spin because you don’t reach the critical angle of attack. However if you leave it too long before starting the turn you’ll start to tailslide!

    * Do not attempt without an aerobatic rating! *

  21. bdcp on September 1st, 2009 4:11 am

    crazy pilot
    crazy pilot

  22. deepfryd on September 1st, 2009 4:11 am

    How do you do a …
    How do you do a stall-turn without going into a spin? Perfectly vertical and full rudder?

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