Get a Private Pilots License, but to tall and round for a Cessna?

September 17, 2009

I want to get a pilots license but I am a large man at 6’3" tall and 400 lbs and all of the schools I have talked to use small aircraft like the Cessna that I can’t fly in do to weight restrictions. While I have been loosing the weight, I am down from 480, I don’t want to wait another year before I can fit in a cessna.

In a 172 weight won’t be an issue. I’m 6’1 and like another person has already said, I too have to raise the seat about half way. If you’re under 7 feet you can fit in a 172. The problem I see is the width of the plane. I’m a small guy, I’m about a third of your size and find a 172 a little cramped. I don’t think you’ll be comfortable in one. I do suggest you ask to try a 172 on for size. You should be able to find an instructor who is on the small size. You will be cramped, but it may be tolerable.

If it absolutely doesn’t work for you then there are other planes out there for you. A 182 is a little wider inside, it also has higher performance and better payload capacity. You’ll be able to fly with full tanks, most any instructor you choose, and still not have to worry about exceeding max gross weight, all while having the performance to fly on hot days without any worries.

Larger airplanes cost more. That’s just the nature of the beast, so keep that in mind. a 172 will run you in the neighborhood of $80-140 per hour depending on age, equipment and location. I pay $95. a 182 will run you from about $95-160. I know of a 182 (with retractable gear) that is available for $135 an hour. Multiply the difference by an average of 60 hours to earn your private and you can see the price difference is significant.

Check out your local flight schools and ask what their options are. There are several dozen types of airplanes you could find at a flight school, far more than I could talk about here.

There are very few reasons to not learn to fly, weight and/or height aren’t usually among them.

Comments

2 Responses to “Get a Private Pilots License, but to tall and round for a Cessna?”

  1. Concorde on September 17th, 2009 7:56 am

    Well height is really not an issue I am 6ft exactly and need to raise my seat to see the engine cowling when I fly. However weight, well 400lbs is a lot it does not exceed the C/172 max T/O weight but it will throw the weight and balance out of whack which is very important especially when doing maneuvers.

    For your safety it is recommended to loose weight before getting a medical (especially if you want to pursue professional flying IE. ATP) loose some weight sorry if I sound crude but I mean it with the utmost respect. You’ve nothing to loose but health and flight to gain.

    Best of luck hope to see you in the sky’s to.

    Regards
    References :
    Student pilot nearing end of PPL training

  2. Dennis M on September 17th, 2009 8:44 am

    In a 172 weight won’t be an issue. I’m 6’1 and like another person has already said, I too have to raise the seat about half way. If you’re under 7 feet you can fit in a 172. The problem I see is the width of the plane. I’m a small guy, I’m about a third of your size and find a 172 a little cramped. I don’t think you’ll be comfortable in one. I do suggest you ask to try a 172 on for size. You should be able to find an instructor who is on the small size. You will be cramped, but it may be tolerable.

    If it absolutely doesn’t work for you then there are other planes out there for you. A 182 is a little wider inside, it also has higher performance and better payload capacity. You’ll be able to fly with full tanks, most any instructor you choose, and still not have to worry about exceeding max gross weight, all while having the performance to fly on hot days without any worries.

    Larger airplanes cost more. That’s just the nature of the beast, so keep that in mind. a 172 will run you in the neighborhood of $80-140 per hour depending on age, equipment and location. I pay $95. a 182 will run you from about $95-160. I know of a 182 (with retractable gear) that is available for $135 an hour. Multiply the difference by an average of 60 hours to earn your private and you can see the price difference is significant.

    Check out your local flight schools and ask what their options are. There are several dozen types of airplanes you could find at a flight school, far more than I could talk about here.

    There are very few reasons to not learn to fly, weight and/or height aren’t usually among them.
    References :

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