Cessna Citation 560 busting out of short strip

November 9, 2009

Cessna 560 getting it done. 2,200′ x 40′ runway.

Duration : 0:0:39


Comments

25 Responses to “Cessna Citation 560 busting out of short strip”

  1. golfer6716 on November 9th, 2009 6:25 am

    When you own a …
    When you own a slowtation, you have to pedal as hard as you can.

  2. TrainSounds on November 9th, 2009 6:25 am

    Where was this in?
    Where was this in?

  3. wazzu90FIJI on November 9th, 2009 6:25 am

    Not Lopez.
    Not Lopez.

  4. usmeagle91 on November 9th, 2009 6:25 am

    Damn! That Cessna …
    Damn! That Cessna was doing work!

  5. Raacon101 on November 9th, 2009 6:25 am

    It is Lopez Island, …
    It is Lopez Island, Washington You can here the pilot say “delta delta Lopez Island” right at the end.

  6. ksa5223 on November 9th, 2009 6:25 am

    with jet engine it …
    with jet engine it may have something to do with if your not rolling, the differential pressure between inlet / exhaust doesn’t change much until you get some knots under your belt anyway as the ram air pressure in the duct plays a big part in the compression.

    In prop aircraft I do full power on the brakes all the time! =) Surely it would be of advantage in a jet also though by some degree.

  7. verobeach0 on November 9th, 2009 6:25 am

    you will accelerate …
    you will accelerate at the same speed with a static takeoff or a normal throttle up takeoff.

  8. sksakm14 on November 9th, 2009 6:25 am

    I guess what I’m …
    I guess what I’m saying is that if you have your maximum power or close to it over the whole takeoff run you WILL accelerate faster and therefore leave the ground faster than is you use up runway while building up your power. The lengths are not the same and it is bogus to say so. No offense intended.

  9. sksakm14 on November 9th, 2009 6:25 am

    Well, not sure I …
    Well, not sure I believe on this one. One, I have personal experience to the contrary (albeit in a ‘lowly’ Mooney) and if you hold the brakes while going to full power your average thrust over the takeoff run will be higher. Think about it, say you hold the brakes till 60 percent thrust and for the sake of our argument you aren’t to full power until the end of the strip. Average thrust is 80 percent. No brakes and your average thrust would be 50 percent if this was an accurate estimation

  10. henri1389 on November 9th, 2009 6:25 am

    Breaks release TO’s …
    Breaks release TO’s rock!!

  11. plane45036 on November 9th, 2009 6:25 am

    mountain air?
    mountain air?

  12. beergut111 on November 9th, 2009 6:25 am

    whatever you say… …
    whatever you say……jets are certified diffrently than a king air….you seem to have them all confused.

    let me know and ill help you out.

    cya

  13. kingair81r on November 9th, 2009 6:25 am

    I think we both …
    I think we both mean the same thing just wording it differently no biggie have a good one

  14. kingair81r on November 9th, 2009 6:25 am

    I am not talking …
    I am not talking about the performance figures iam talking about the requirements between part 91 and part135 operations. Runway requirements are established by the balanced field length depending upon weight, OAT, winds and altitude of the field msl. Legaly you can operate a jet below the balanced field length requirements under part 91 but not 135 even though the jet can get off the ground with a much shorter runway. Also balanced field length is just accel to v1 then complete stop.

  15. beergut111 on November 9th, 2009 6:25 am

    you dont understand …
    you dont understand what “balanced field length” is….it isnt a requirement at all.

    Jet have to comply with 2nd segment and runway requiremts regardless if 91,135. Balanced field length is where accel/stop and accel/go are the same distance, that is a performance number that dont change. It means the distance to accel to v1 and stop….is the same as accel to v1 and GO, the result of those two values is a runway distance. That is balanced field length. Any questions?

  16. kingair81r on November 9th, 2009 6:25 am

    Jets have way more …
    Jets have way more power and performance than prop planes I was talking legality you dont have to comply with balanced field length requirements.

  17. beergut111 on November 9th, 2009 6:25 am

    in a jet you have …
    in a jet you have to have it, in a prop you dont. Jets have to have the performance regardless of what part you operate under.

  18. verobeach0 on November 9th, 2009 6:25 am

    It’s not 2NCO or …
    It’s not 2NCO or Turtle Island. It’s somewhere is NC.

  19. medicinecloset on November 9th, 2009 6:25 am

    LOL He had room to …
    LOL He had room to spare guy’s.Geez.

  20. kingair81r on November 9th, 2009 6:25 am

    Your right part 91 …
    Your right part 91 your own plane nothing in front to damage or kill go for it. Never as part 135 you would be insane.

  21. wazzu90FIJI on November 9th, 2009 6:25 am

    No weeds except …
    No weeds except maybe Seaweed 😉

  22. RobertGary1 on November 9th, 2009 6:25 am

    Balanced field is …
    Balanced field is where the V1 distance plus the accelerated stop distance is less than the field length. Balanced field is required for 135 but not 91. I suspect that if this guy had a V1 cut he’d have been in the weeds. But then again, you have to live life; I’d probably have done it part 91.

  23. zulquarnainanwar on November 9th, 2009 6:25 am

    true, slowing this …
    true, slowing this plane down on a runway and in air is really hard as these babies acquire too much of an airspeed upon a little trickle on the throttle, i fee landing uponl it really hard when i am upon a visual approach on a short runway. Anyways, but i love the ultra better than the standard C560

  24. easydialog on November 9th, 2009 6:25 am

    The C560 and C560 …
    The C560 and C560 Ultra have a lot of power (about 2 x 3500 lbs on MSL ISA). Having an empty aircraft with little fuel, you may get an TO weight of around 10000 lbs. When doing a static take off with an C560 Ultra around this weight, you can crash the glasses in the galley. The shortest TO of an Ultra i have witnessed is around 1200 feet. Landing below 2700 feet is a hassle.

  25. 33hartz on November 9th, 2009 6:25 am

    Forget the take off …
    Forget the take off.

    That means he had to land there. I want to see that one.

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