Can you go through a hurricane in a Cessna?

January 20, 2010

I appreciate the answers fellas, but if I go into one, I am going head first right through the heart of it.

Not Recommended.

But if you really want to try, use a low wing Cessna like a Cessna 400 or other low wing planes. If you fly into the Hurricane fly with the prevailing winds meaning flying with the counter rotation of the storm. This will reduce the turbulence but not by much but enough to make the ride safer than flying right in to it. When Hurricane Hunters fly into Hurricanes they fly this route because a direct bunch would put extreme pressures on the planes structure which could buffet it to pieces. Reason is that the turbulence in a hurricane are rough at minimum to Extreme. With low wing aircraft the pressure exerted in the wings is reduced and spread evenly. With that said you could still be buffeted to the point of structural failure and wind up at the bottom of the Ocean. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cessna_400

DO NOT ATTEMPT in a Cessna 172 or other over wing plane. Reason the turbulence will push the wings upwards and then downwards causing them to break off or fold upwards, thus sending you to the bottom of the Ocean. The wings that are positioned high on a plane try their best to avoid severe or extreme turbulence for this very reason. There isn’t enough structural support for the wing and that is why you see the support beams most all over wing aircraft except the really large transports which have supper strong Internal skeletal systems.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cessna_172

4 Hurricane Hunter Planes have been lost since 1945 flying into or out of these storms.
Best bet avoid all thunder storms and Hurricanes.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hurricane_Hunters

Comments

9 Responses to “Can you go through a hurricane in a Cessna?”

  1. John on January 20th, 2010 4:51 am

    no
    References :

  2. Frank Lowell on January 20th, 2010 5:22 am

    Depends on the intensity of the hurricane, the size of the Cessna, and how you cross.

    If you are facing a low intensity, low pressure hurricane, cross onto the side in the sense of the wind (not facing the wind) and you are flying a Cessna Citation X, nothing will happen to you : You’ll just have an uncomfortable flight 🙂
    References :
    Low-to-Medium range business-jet Co-Pilot

  3. RickH on January 20th, 2010 6:03 am

    Which Cessna. With no radar to avoid the thunderstorms, it would be foolhardy. On the other hand, with radar, most of the twin Cessnas could probably do it, especially the jets, but it would be very uncomfortable.
    References :

  4. Warbird Pilot on January 20th, 2010 6:34 am

    No.
    References :

  5. pecker_head_bill on January 20th, 2010 6:52 am

    Only if your in a very secure hangar.
    References :

  6. ? on January 20th, 2010 6:57 am

    gonna have to give u a big fat no there pal 😛
    References :

  7. Techwing on January 20th, 2010 7:23 am

    The risk of an accident is extremely high when flying through a hurricane, although it is conceivable that a Cessna (or other aircraft) might make it.

    In practice, pilots never, ever fly through thunderstorms, hurricanes, or tornadoes. Those who attempt to do so usually end up like Air France Flight 447.
    References :

  8. Rapid Fire on January 20th, 2010 7:50 am

    Only if your cargo is rabbits feet and even then there are no guarantees.
    References :

  9. Flanker on January 20th, 2010 8:27 am

    Not Recommended.

    But if you really want to try, use a low wing Cessna like a Cessna 400 or other low wing planes. If you fly into the Hurricane fly with the prevailing winds meaning flying with the counter rotation of the storm. This will reduce the turbulence but not by much but enough to make the ride safer than flying right in to it. When Hurricane Hunters fly into Hurricanes they fly this route because a direct bunch would put extreme pressures on the planes structure which could buffet it to pieces. Reason is that the turbulence in a hurricane are rough at minimum to Extreme. With low wing aircraft the pressure exerted in the wings is reduced and spread evenly. With that said you could still be buffeted to the point of structural failure and wind up at the bottom of the Ocean. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cessna_400

    DO NOT ATTEMPT in a Cessna 172 or other over wing plane. Reason the turbulence will push the wings upwards and then downwards causing them to break off or fold upwards, thus sending you to the bottom of the Ocean. The wings that are positioned high on a plane try their best to avoid severe or extreme turbulence for this very reason. There isn’t enough structural support for the wing and that is why you see the support beams most all over wing aircraft except the really large transports which have supper strong Internal skeletal systems.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cessna_172

    4 Hurricane Hunter Planes have been lost since 1945 flying into or out of these storms.
    Best bet avoid all thunder storms and Hurricanes.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hurricane_Hunters
    References :
    Aviation Knowledge

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