Is it important whether or not a flight school is Cessna certified?

January 20, 2010

It’s a clause in a PPL scholarship I’m applying for and I wanted to know why.

Is a school less reputable if it does not have a Cessna certification?
What does the certification mean?
Does it mean the school is certified to fly Cessna-brand planes?

If it’s a clause in your scholarship, then Cessna might be involved in funding part of it.
So, if it’s a requirement, you’d need to train at one.

Having trained at both a Cessna Pilot Center and ones that weren’t, there really is no difference.
Only the training materials and syllabus varied.
The quality of the training is entirely dependent on the quality of the instructors.

I do prefer the course materials for the Cessna course. (Specifically, the instrument rating course)

Comments

4 Responses to “Is it important whether or not a flight school is Cessna certified?”

  1. Jimmbbo on January 20th, 2010 4:40 am

    Short answer is no…

    Cessna certification simply means that the school uses a Cessna designed curriculum, and flies Cessna airplanes… It ensures a standard curriculum, but the quality of the instruction depends strongly on the instructor.

    Many non-Cessna certified FBOs provide quality instruction with other curricula from other vendors (Jeppesen among them)

    Selecting the right school will require visiting the facilities, asking questions and observing how they do business, and talking to people who are receiving training from them. You are going to spend a fair amount of money, and it is worth spending some time finding a good operation.

    If you have a pilot friend, buy him lunch and ask him to join you in your search… most pilots will jump at free food and an opportunity to go to the airport 😉
    References :

  2. greg f on January 20th, 2010 5:27 am

    Agreed, Its not.. A Cessna pilot Center flies mainly Cessna aircraft, Use the Cessna ground school (produced my King Schools) and have paid a lot of money to Cessna…

    Take all that away and you end up being trained to the exact same standards, have to demonstrate the same things on the check ride and may even take the check ride with the same examiner..

    The only reason why I can think it would be required by your scholarship is maybe they are looking for whats called a part 141 school. Meaning they have a set way of doing things (Cessnas way) and have summited a lot of paperwork to the FAA. In theory this should allow you to finish faster.. In the real world… It won’t
    References :
    Flight Instructor

  3. Skyhawk on January 20th, 2010 6:14 am

    If it’s a clause in your scholarship, then Cessna might be involved in funding part of it.
    So, if it’s a requirement, you’d need to train at one.

    Having trained at both a Cessna Pilot Center and ones that weren’t, there really is no difference.
    Only the training materials and syllabus varied.
    The quality of the training is entirely dependent on the quality of the instructors.

    I do prefer the course materials for the Cessna course. (Specifically, the instrument rating course)
    References :

  4. tazmaniac0350 on January 20th, 2010 6:50 am

    all the answer i think are correct, the dif in my mind is cessna certified pilot training centers are staffed with low time cfi’ that dont really have real world flying eccept for the training theyve done and maybe some longer xcountry flights. i prefer to go to older flight instructors that have flown military, commercial with lots of hours. dont get me wrong I think the cfis do teach to high standards but the older pilots will teach more tricks of the trade like landing at night with no landing light on as well as alot of other things. hey if your getting a scholarship go for it though there really are some good teachers out there.
    References :

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