ASG Training Center – Simulador Beechcraft King Air 350

July 20, 2011


El centro de entrenamiento aeronáutico tecnológicamente más avanzado de la Argentina. Contamos con un Simulador Boeing 737NG, un Simulador B200, un Simulador B350 y un Simulador (ATD-701). Se dicatan cursos de: Vuelo por Instrumentos, Entrenamiento Básico Instrumental, Inglés Aeronáutico de Última Generación, Advanced Crew Concept Training, Line Oriented Flight Training. ASG Training Center está dirigido por los mejores profesionales de la avición.

CKAS 6DOF Full Motion Flight Simulator – Beechcraft 58 Baron Simulator

September 14, 2010


CKAS Full Motion 6DOF Flight Simulators: CKAS Produces commercial accredited Full Motion Flight Training Devices as part of a standard offering in the CKAS MotionSim3 and MotionSim5 range. This simulator is modeled around the Beechcraft 58 Baron type aircraft, and is aimed at the CASA category C Synthetic Trainer Standard. The video demonstrates the level of fidelity of our units, and as such is testament that our engineers can develop a simulator of any “type” for your needs. The level of fidelity in the cockpit is unsurpassed by any other units on the market at this price point. Visit www.ckas.com.au for more information.

Beechcraft BE95 Touch and Go at IGM

September 3, 2010


Beechcraft Travel Air (BE95) Touch and Go practice at Kingman Airport (IGM) Arizona.

Cessna Tribute

February 3, 2009

The Cessna Aircraft Company is an airplane manufacturing corporation headquartered in Wichita, Kansas, USA. Their main products are general aviation aircraft. Although they are the most well-known for their small, piston-powered aircraft, they also produce business jets. The company is a subsidiary of the U.S. conglomerate Textron.

The company traces its history to June 1911, when Clyde Cessna, a farmer in Rago, Kansas, built a wood-and-fabric plane and became the first person to build and fly an aircraft between the Mississippi River and the Rocky Mountains. Clyde Cessna started his aircraft ventures in Enid, Oklahoma, testing many of his early planes on the salt flats. When bankers in Enid refused to loan him more money to build his planes, he moved to Wichita. In 1924, Cessna partnered with Lloyd C. Stearman and Walter H. Beech to form the Travel Air, Inc., a biplane manufacturing firm. This company was based in Wichita. In 1927, Clyde Cessna left Travel Air and formed his own company, the Cessna Aircraft Company. Instead of producing biplanes, he instead decided to focus on building monoplanes. The first flew on August 13, 1927.
Cessna Aircraft Company closed its doors from 1932 until 1934 due to the state of the economy. In 1934, Dwane Wallace, with the help of his brother Dwight, took control of the company and began the process of building it into what would become a global success.
After World War II, Cessna created the 170, which, along with later models (notably the 172), became the most widely produced light aircraft in history. Cessna’s advertising boasts that it has delivered more aircraft than any other company, over 190,000 by the end of 2008.
In 1972 Cessna became the first aircraft manufacturer in the world to build 100,000 aircraft. The 100,000th aircraft was one of 24 Cessnas of various models displayed at Transpo 72.
In 1985 Cessna was bought by General Dynamics Corporation and in 1986 production of piston-engine aircraft was suspended. General Dynamics cited product liability as the cause. The then-CEO Russ Meyer said that production would resume if a more favorable product liability environment developed. In 1992, Textron Inc. bought Cessna and, after passage of the General Aviation Revitalization Act of 1994, resumed production of the piston-engine 172, 182, and 206 designs.
On 27 November, 2007, Textron announced that Cessna had purchased the bankrupt Columbia Aircraft company for US$26.4M and would continue production of the Columbia 350 and 400 as the Cessna 350 and Cessna 400 at the Columbia factory in Bend, Oregon. There had been speculation that the acquisition of the Columbia line would spell the end of the Cessna NGP project, but on September 26, 2007, Cessna Vice President for Sales, Roger Whyte, confirmed that development of the NGP project will continue, unaffected by the purchase of Columbia. Since November 2007, the company has been involved in a public controversy regarding the contracting of production of the Cessna 162 SkyCatcher to the Shenyang Aircraft Corporation of the People’s Republic of China. Currently, Cessna produces 2-, 4- and 6-place single-engine airplanes, utility turboprops, and business jets.

Duration : 0:3:58

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F-16 Intercepts Jet & Turboprop Legally Flying Through MOA

January 6, 2009

When two GA pilots, one flying a Pilatus PC-12 and the other in a Beechcraft Premier jet, encountered an F-16 in a Military Operations Area used by Luke Air Force Base in Arizona last March, they had to take abrupt, evasive maneuvers to avoid the military jet. The incident, after it was http://www.avweb.com/avwebflash/news/F16EncounterAngersPilots_197487-1.html first reported in AVwebFlash, set off a lively debate among pilots on AVweb’s http://www.avweb.com/blogs/insider/AVwebInsiderBlog_IfYouCantHandleMigs_F16s_MOAs_197505-1.html blog about the wisdom of flying in MOAs, and prompted an in-depth report in our sister publication, Aviation Safety. This week, AOPA obtained a http://www.aopa.org/flightplanning/articles/2008/080707f-16.html video clip from the FAA showing the radar screen during the encounter, and also the voice tape from Air Traffic Control. The F-16 pilot has been reprimanded, and Luke officials told AOPA they will alter their training program to encourage their pilots to avoid similar encounters in the future. In a http://www.avweb.com/podcast/podcast/197492-1.html?kw=RelatedStory podcast interview with AVweb, PC-12 pilot Patrick McCall said his TCAS activated about 10 a.m. that day while he was cruising at 16,500 feet (VFR with flight following) and he had to dive his aircraft as the target kept closing on him. The target followed him in the dive and when McCall leveled at about 14,000 feet, he was amazed by the view from his side window. “I then looked to my left side of the aircraft and saw an F16 aircraft off of my left wing,” he said in a written report sent to the FAA. “The F16 was no more than 20 feet off of my left wing.”

Duration : 0:3:17

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