CLS_VLJ Tips and Tricks – Part 1 of 2

December 16, 2010


A video on the operation of the CLS_VLJ Eclipse 500 flight training device, designed to help owners get the most from their CLS flight training device.

Boot Camp for New Dads Offers Tips for Taking Care of Moms-to-be

August 5, 2010

 

Bishop, who founded Boot Camp for New Dads in 1990 and has helped to prepare more than 200,000 men for fatherhood over the years, offers important advice from his second book, Crash Course for New Dads:  Tools, Checklists and Cheat Sheets on how to support a mom-to-be:

 

Communicate.  Make it a point to talk to each other about your thoughts, concerns about the new baby and plans for the future.  Even if mom seems to be handling pregnancy well, talking about what is happening now and in the future is the best way for you to prepare to be a family.

 

Get moving.   Forego sitting around watching television.  Take walks together.  Not only will this physically benefit the both of you, it will also open the lines of communication.

 

Show her you care.  Pregnancy is the time to take it up a notch and get even more creative in showing her how much you care about her and the baby.  For example, if she has a craving for ice cream, call her from the ice cream store and read her the flavors.  Paint the nursery with rainbows.  You get the idea.

 

Help her cope.  Moms-to-be will experience countless physical and emotional changes.  You can help her through this by becoming more knowledgeable about her symptoms.  Take the initiative and read some of her favorite pregnancy books.  If she doesn’t have any books yet, be a hero and make the trip to the bookstore or library and ask the staff for recommendations.

 

Let her lean on you.  The physical and emotional impacts of pregnancy may be intense and she is going to depend on you to help her get through the roughest times.  From cravings to morning sickness, intense backaches and more, she’ll benefit from you comforting her and helping her to hold it all together.

 

Accompany her to the doctor.  This is the single most important thing you can do during pregnancy, as visits with the obstetrician get you personally connected with what’s going on with mom and your baby.  Keep the focus on mom and make sure she is getting all her questions answered.

 

“Every mom-to-be will experience a unique rollercoaster of physical and emotional changes.  Dads have the important job of taking care of mom before, during and after the birth of their child,” explained Bishop. “During pregnancy, dads tend to serve as the ‘punching bag’ for all moms’ frustrations.  Be patient and understanding.  Don’t get drawn into arguments and try to show her the lighter side of things.  Laughter can relieve a lot of stress.”

 

Bishop’s first book, Hit the Ground Crawling, is focused on work balance; being a dad and caring for mom.  Both books are available online at www.DadsAdventure.com.

                                                                                                            

New Dads Learn What to Expect at Boot Camp Workshops

Dads-to-be will be better equipped to face the challenges and opportunities of fatherhood after attending a Boot Camp “hands on” educational workshop. Men attend the class when they are expecting their first baby, and are joined in the workshop by “veterans” who had previously attended and have returned with their two to four-month-old baby in tow.  They are able to give the dads-to-be a realistic idea of what to do and what to expect when their first baby comes. 

 

Boot Camp for New Dads    

Now celebrating their 18th year, Boot Camp for New Dads is nationally acclaimed as the “Best Practice” for preparing men to be fathers and has been named a U.S. Navy Model Program.  Boot Camp for New Dads has prepared more than 200,000 men for fatherhood over the years. 

           

With more than 4.1 million births last year alone (National Center for Health Statistics), and approximately 1.5 million men becoming new dads every year, it’s more important than ever for fathers to realize that being a “good provider” is only part of the very central role they have in their children’s lives. 

 

For more information about Boot Camp for New Dads, visit www.bcnd.org.  To arrange an interview with Greg Bishop, please contact sdubin@prworkzone.com, (781) 582-1061.

 

National and International Locations

Boot Camp For New Dads locations include ALASKA (Anchorage); ARIZONA (Chandler, Flagstaff, Gilbert, Mesa, Phoenix, Scottsdale, Sun City); ARKANSAS (Jonesboro, Paragould, Springdale); CALIFORNIA (Apple Valley, Bakersfield, , Fresno, Garden Grove, Irvine, Laguna Hills, Madera, Merced, Mission Hills, , Oakland, Orange, Pomona, Port Hueneme, San Diego, Santa Ana, Santa Barbara, , S. Lake Tahoe, Travis, Valley Springs); COLORADO (Aurora, Boulder, Colorado Springs, Denver, Durango, Fort Collins, Fort Carson, Greeley, Longmont, Thornton, Wheat Ridge); CONNECTICUT (Bristol, Danbury, New London); FLORIDA (Brandon, Clearwater, Hollywood, Jacksonville, North Palm Beach, Orlando, St. Petersburg, West Palm Beach, Sarasota, Tampa); GEORGIA (Atlanta, Elberton, Gainesville, Marietta, Savannah); HAWAII (Pearl Harbor, Schofield); ILLINOIS (Aurora, Carbondale, Champaign, Chicago, East St. Louis, Evanston, Freeport, Geneva, Great Lakes, Highland Park, Libertyville, Moline, Oak Park, Rockford, Springfield, Urbana, Winfield); INDIANA (Anderson, Bluffton, Hammond, Indianapolis, Jeffersonville, Kokomo); IOWA (Cedar Rapids, Des Moines, Jefferson, Sioux City); KANSAS (Junction City, Topeka); KENTUCKY (Paducah); LOUISIANA (Covington); MAINE (Auburn, Augusta, Bangor, Brunswick, Ellsworth, Waterville); MARYLAND (Annapolis) MASSACHUSETTS (Beverly, Ipswich, Lowell, Nantucket, Plymouth, Weymouth, Springfield); MICHIGAN (, Ann Arbor, Bay City, Centreville, Iron Mountain, Ithaca, Kalamazoo, Niles, St Joseph, Ypsilanti); MINNESOTA (Brainerd, Duluth, Robbinsdale); MISSISSIPPI (Tupelo); MISSOURI (Jefferson City) MONTANA (Billings, Helena, Miles City); NEBRASKA (Kearney, Lincoln, Omaha); NEVADA (Las Vegas) NEW HAMPSHIRE (Manchester, Portsmouth); NEW JERSEY (Princeton) NEW YORK (Glens Falls, Little Falls, Mineola, Rome, Utica); NORTH CAROLINA (Burlington, Chapel Hill, Charlotte, Concord, Ft. Bragg, Greensboro, Monroe, Raleigh, Shelby); NORTH DAKOTA (Grand Forks); OHIO (Akron, Cleveland, Columbus, East Cleveland, East Liverpool, Garfield Heights, Lima, Lorain, Mayfield Heights, Middleburg Heights, Orange Village, Portsmouth, Toledo, Warren, Westlake, Youngstown); OKLAHOMA (Claremore, Oklahoma City, Tulsa); OREGON (Corvalis, McMinnville, Salem, Silverton); SOUTH CAROLINA (Columbia, Pickens, Walhalla); TENNESSEE (Chattanooga, Knoxville, Memphis); TEXAS (Amarillo, Dallas, Fort Hood, Longview, Lubbock, Plano, San Antonio, Texarkana, Waco, Webster); VERMONT (Barre, Brattleboro, Middlebury); VIRGINIA (Charlottesville, Chesapeake, Hampton, Richmond) WASHINGTON (Everett, Fairchild AFB, Longview, Olympia, Puyallup, Yakima); WEST VIRGINIA (Wheeling); WISCONSIN (Florence, Green Bay, Madison, Oshkosh, Watertown, Wausau); JAPAN (Atsugi, Yokosuka), ITALY (Sicily); UNITED KINGDOM [a.k.a. Hit the Ground Crawling] (Birmingham, Liverpool)

Boot Camp for New Dads Offer Tips for Keeping Your Baby Safe around the Holidays

June 7, 2010

                                

DATELINE:  IRVINE, CA …

              

 One of the most important concepts they teach new dads is how to provide a safe environment and keep the baby safe.  The holidays are busy and it’s more challenging than ever to keep the baby away from choking hazards and other dangers.

                                                                       

Greg Bishop, founder of Boot Camp for New Dads and author of two fatherhood books, shares tips from his second book, Crash Course for New Dads – Tools, Checklists and Cheat-Sheets for keeping your baby safe around the holidays:

                                                        

Toxins.   Sprucing up the house before the holidays?  Giving yourself a manicure before heading out to that holiday party?  Paints and lacquers, even nail polish and remover should not be used in the vicinity of your baby.  A newborn’s immune system is not fully developed, and these substances can be harmful even in small doses.

 

Smoking.  Though you and your spouse may not smoke, visiting relatives may not have a problem with lighting up around your baby.  Unlike you, your baby can’t move out of harm’s way.  Ask visiting smokers to take it outside or to the garage, far away from your baby’s lungs.

 

Pockets.  It’s always merry with a houseful of family and friends at the holidays.  But, with so many people moving around; sitting down and standing up – be aware that things can fall out of your guests’ pockets without anyone noticing.  You’re may grab hold of a small item and have it in her mouth before you know it.  Even swallowing a single penny might require your baby to go through surgery.  Stay aware and don’t be afraid to ask your guests to empty their pockets before holding your baby.

 

Salt and Honey.  Though you know the rules about not feeding salt and honey to your baby; family and friends may not.  Although you can’t keep sodium out of your baby’s food, excess salt is detrimental to his kidneys and blood pressure.  And, up until your baby turns one year old, babies should NEVER be fed honey.  Honey can cause infant botulism, which could lead to death.  Be sure that well-meaning relatives who may not be aware of the rules don’t allow your baby to sample even a bite of holiday cuisine without checking with you first. 

                                                                                            

Decorations.  Holiday decorations are a feast for the eyes.  Unfortunately, they are also a choking hazard to babies and toddlers who may find small pieces and put them in their mouths.  When decorating your home, use the “slide-and-hide” technique.  Take a toilet-paper tube and use it as a measuring device.  If an object can slide down the tube, it can also slide down your baby’s breathing passage.  Put those decorations that don’t pass this test away until your baby is much older.  And, of course keep a watchful eye on your baby when visiting relatives or friends with older children who may have decorations and small toys around their home.

 

About the Boot Camp for New Dads Program

Boot Camp for New Dads has worked with more than 200,000 new dads at their workshops held over the past 19 years.  After attending a Boot Camp for New Dads “hands on” educational workshop, dads-to-be are better equipped to face the challenges and opportunities of fatherhood.  Men attend the class when they are expecting their first baby, and are joined in the workshop by “veterans” who had previously attended and have returned with their two to four-month-old baby in tow.  They are able to give the dads-to-be a realistic idea of what to do and what to expect when their first baby comes.  For many men attending, it’s their first time holding a baby.

 

Boot Camp for New Dads        

Now celebrating their 19th year, Boot Camp for New Dads is nationally acclaimed as the “Best Practice” for preparing men to be fathers and has been named a U.S. Navy Model Program.  Boot Camp for New Dads has prepared more than 200,000 men for fatherhood over the years. 

           

With more than 4.1 million births (National Center for Health Statistics), and approximately 1.5 million men becoming new dads every year, it’s more important than ever for fathers to realize that being a “good provider” is only part of the very central role they have in their children’s lives. 

 

For more information about Boot Camp for New Dads, visit www.bcnd.org.  To arrange an interview with Greg Bishop, please contact sdubin@prworkzone.com, (781) 582-1061.

                                                                                 

National and International Locations

Boot Camp For New Dads locations include ALASKA (Anchorage); ARIZONA (Chandler, Flagstaff, Gilbert, Mesa, Phoenix, Scottsdale, Sun City); ARKANSAS (Jonesboro, Paragould, Springdale); CALIFORNIA (Apple Valley, Bakersfield, , Fresno, Garden Grove, Irvine, Laguna Hills, Madera, Merced, Mission Hills, , Oakland, Orange, Pomona, Port Hueneme, San Diego, Santa Ana, Santa Barbara, , S. Lake Tahoe, Travis, Valley Springs); COLORADO (Aurora, Boulder, Colorado Springs, Denver, Durango, Fort Collins, Fort Carson, Greeley, Longmont, Thornton, Wheat Ridge); CONNECTICUT (Bristol, Danbury, New London); FLORIDA (Brandon, Clearwater, Hollywood, Jacksonville, North Palm Beach, Orlando, St. Petersburg, West Palm Beach, Sarasota, Tampa); GEORGIA (Atlanta, Elberton, Gainesville, Marietta, Savannah); HAWAII (Pearl Harbor, Schofield); ILLINOIS (Aurora, Carbondale, Champaign, Chicago, East St. Louis, Evanston, Freeport, Geneva, Great Lakes, Highland Park, Libertyville, Moline, Oak Park, Rockford, Springfield, Urbana, Winfield); INDIANA (Anderson, Bluffton, Hammond, Indianapolis, Jeffersonville, Kokomo); IOWA (Cedar Rapids, Des Moines, Jefferson, Sioux City); KANSAS (Junction City, Topeka); KENTUCKY (Paducah); LOUISIANA (Covington); MAINE (Auburn, Augusta, Bangor, Brunswick, Ellsworth, Waterville); MARYLAND (Annapolis) MASSACHUSETTS (Beverly, Ipswich, Lowell, Nantucket, Plymouth, Weymouth, Springfield); MICHIGAN (, Ann Arbor, Bay City, Centreville, Iron Mountain, Ithaca, Kalamazoo, Niles, St Joseph, Ypsilanti); MINNESOTA (Brainerd, Duluth, Robbinsdale); MISSISSIPPI (Tupelo); MISSOURI (Jefferson City) MONTANA (Billings, Helena, Miles City); NEBRASKA (Kearney, Lincoln, Omaha); NEVADA (Las Vegas) NEW HAMPSHIRE (Manchester, Portsmouth); NEW JERSEY (Princeton) NEW YORK (Glens Falls, Little Falls, Mineola, Rome, Utica); NORTH CAROLINA (Burlington, Chapel Hill, Charlotte, Concord, Ft. Bragg, Greensboro, Monroe, Raleigh, Shelby); NORTH DAKOTA (Grand Forks); OHIO (Akron, Cleveland, Columbus, East Cleveland, East Liverpool, Garfield Heights, Lima, Lorain, Mayfield Heights, Middleburg Heights, Orange Village, Portsmouth, Toledo, Warren, Westlake, Youngstown); OKLAHOMA (Claremore, Oklahoma City, Tulsa); OREGON (Corvalis, McMinnville, Salem, Silverton); SOUTH CAROLINA (Columbia, Pickens, Walhalla); TENNESSEE (Chattanooga, Knoxville, Memphis); TEXAS (Amarillo, Dallas, Fort Hood, Longview, Lubbock, Plano, San Antonio, Texarkana, Waco, Webster); VERMONT (Barre, Brattleboro, Middlebury); VIRGINIA (Charlottesville, Chesapeake, Hampton, Richmond) WASHINGTON (Everett, Fairchild AFB, Longview, Olympia, Puyallup, Yakima); WEST VIRGINIA (Wheeling); WISCONSIN (Florence, Green Bay, Madison, Oshkosh, Watertown, Wausau); JAPAN (Atsugi, Yokosuka), ITALY (Sicily); UNITED KINGDOM [a.k.a. Hit the Ground Crawling] (Birmingham, Liverpool)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rotor Aviation – Tips On Making It Through Helicopter Flight Training In San Diego, CA

March 2, 2010

Have you ever dreamed of becoming a pilot? If so, you may have considered attending a helicopter flight school. But before you make the decision to invest your energy into helicopter flight training, it’s a good idea to see if you have the basic characteristics to do well in such an environment.Below is a checklist of eight personality traits that most successful helicopter flight school graduates possess. Although it’s not necessary for you to see each attribute in yourself, you should have at least half or more of the qualities.1. Ability to Follow Rules:In order to stay safe during your helicopter flight training, you must be prepared to accept and follow rules. If you’re a person who always has to “try something new” and who cannot conform, you may not enjoy towing the line when it comes to procedures and policies.2. Self-Discipline:Helicopter pilots must possess large amounts of self-discipline. This may mean making choices that are unpopular or unexciting but are best for the safety of the pilot, the passengers (if applicable) and the equipment.3. Thirst for Knowledge :Those who do well in helicopter flight training don’t simply study their manuals; they actively seek out all the information they can find. This helps them get more out of the helicopter flight school experience.4. Ability to Stay Cool under Pressure:Pilots must be cool under pressure, especially when dealing with the unexpected, such as helicopter malfunctions or incidents attributable to “Mother Nature”. If you’re someone who can’t remain calm when there is chaos around you, becoming a helicopter pilot may be too stressful.5. Enjoyment of Air Travel:This may seem obvious, but many attendees of helicopter flight schools forget that in order to do particularly well, they really have to enjoy traveling by air. This means feeling comfortable at significant heights and in physically demanding positions.6. Passion for Excellence:Do you strive to give 110% all the time, every time? If so, you’ll probably do very well during your helicopter flight training. On the other hand, if you are someone who is satisfied with doing the bare minimum, becoming a pilot may be too strenuous for you.7. Good Communicator:As a helicopter pilot, you will be required to communicate on a regular basis with a number of different people. If you’re not able to do so, you may find it a challenge to rise through the ranks of pilots.8. Respect for Others:Pilots must be very “in tune” with the people with whom they work. For instance, if a passenger is terrified to fly in a helicopter, the onus may land squarely on the pilot’s shoulders to empathize with that individual. Everyone wants to be treated with respect.So is attending a helicopter flight school in your future? If you’re the right age and you possess more than 50% of the eight qualities above, why not give it a try? It’s an amazing career path or pastime for the right man or woman. And who knows? That could be you!For more information, visit www.RotorAviation.com.

Flight Training Tips on Becoming a Pilot

February 25, 2010

Becoming a pilot requires extensive and serious training. You carry with you many lives at stake as you fly a plane in the air as a pilot.
Most training courses today are a mixture of practical exercises performed in the air. Aside from this, there is theoretical learning performed on the ground. The initial training is designed especially for beginners. Specialized trainings are done as the student advances.
Full flight simulators and flight training devices are used to train a student pilot in several conditions, at much lesser prices and danger than being airborne. Private pilot flight trainings have a minimum amount of 40 hours. However, most of the students are required to have 50 to 58 hours of flight training.
The prices of flight training classes differ largely from area to area, at around 40 to 60 flight schools for approximately 7,000 US dollar for the PPL or Private Pilot License. The CPL or Commercial Pilot License usually rates from 40,000 US dollars to 60,000 US dollars. It is taken for about 1 to 2 years. These structured training programs are eligible by the FAA to issues pilot license with reduced hours of flight training.
A full time pilot student can complete the training program in 4 to 6 months for their Commercial Pilot License. Several universities offer a 4 year Aviation Degree Program that contains flight training. The Ohio State University, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and University of North Dakota are several of the largest university that offers flight trainings.
Flight training can be extremely demanding emotionally, mentally and physically. Once the student made the decision to start to flight training, a student should do so with great self discipline and determination. With the training and the right resources, most people can learn to fly an aircraft at the basic level.
Tips on Training as a Pilot
Check out some local FBO or Fixed Base Operators. Flight trainings are usually done at the fixed base operator which can be found at some small airport in your area. These Fixed Base Operators are here to control hangar parking, dispense fuel and ramp usage. It usually has an aircraft you can rent out as well as numerous flight instructors that are available to train new students. Training at Fixed Base Operators are great choices for student who want to fly as a hobby and for fun.
Consider an Aeronautical University or College. Numerous universities and colleges in the United State offer full training for pilot bachelor degrees. These colleges or universities may solely emphasize on aeronautical based trainings like Embry-Riddle or may have aviation degrees within a larger umbrella like Central Missouri State University, Purdue University, the University of North Dakota and Parks College at Saint Luis University. This is a great choice for students who want to become a pilot and get a college degree.
Get an instructor. Regardless of who can make it to the flight training facility, students need a pilot instructor that well fits them. This could be one of the most significant decisions you can make throughout the flight training. Do not just accept the first pilot instructor they offer you, especially if you sense that you have different personalities.
You need to get along with this person in close quarters and be able to respect as well as trust their judgment and skills. Once you find a good pilot instructor stick with her or him. Changing pilot instructors numerous times can become confusing since they vary in expectations and techniques.

Kingman Spyder Show! Tips, and other Spyder Clones

February 23, 2010


This show talks a little about Kingman Spyders, Spyder Clones, some tips and tricks also when using spyders. I’m not a very big fan of Kingman Markers, because of how they sneak in: 1) ASA holes are staggered, they are not industry standard 2) Many of the air fittings are metric, and not found in stores 3) Alot of “propriatery” fittings and non-standard parts are found on Kingman markers Kingman has a long history of whore-ing their products out to Wal-Mart. I have no issue with selling to walmart, but don’t do it AFTER you sell to regular paintball stores, and kill their profit. Don’t sell a paintball store a Spyder for $100, then sell the entire product line to walmart for $40 per Spyder. If you want to whore the whole line to walmart, then only sell to walmart! Enjoy!

Grand Canyon National Park: Five Tips to Effectively Travel to the Grand Canyon by Amtrak and Bus

February 21, 2010

Although the Grand Canyon became federally protected in 1893, it did not become a national park until 1919.  The park’s uniqueness comes from it sheer size:  277 river miles long, up to 18 miles wide, and a mile deep. In fact, the Grand Canyon is so large that it has two main points of entry, the North and South Rims, which are 215 miles apart for each other. 

Fortunately, Grand Canyon National Park’s South Rim has Amtrak service close by on the Southwest Chief.  You literally have automobile, train and bus alternatives.   Here are five tips/hints for effectively traveling to/from the Grand Canyon by land:

One:  If you wish to take the train right up to the Canyon, you can board the Grand Canyon Railway.  Once you disembark at Williams Junction, you can take the free shuttle service to the Grand Canyon Hotel and Railway.  For those arriving from the west, there is a five hour layoff before the 9:30 am departure to the Canyon.  If you are going back west, the train leaves the Canyon at 3:30 pm and arrives at the Grand Canyon Hotel at 5:45 pm.  This leaves you with about 3 ½ hours before the shuttle takes you back to the Williams Junction Amtrak station.

Coming from the east, it is not as convenient.  Since the Southwest Chief arrives in the late evening, you will probably want to take the shuttle to the Grand Canyon Hotel and stay the night.  The hotel is well-appointed and resembles the original Santa Fe Railroad hotel in Williams.  After a good breakfast, you will be ready for the 9:30 am departure described above.  Going back east, you may also wish to rent a hotel room since the train leaves Williams Junction in the early morning.

Two:  If you prefer to travel by bus to the canyon, there is convenient service from the Flagstaff Amtrak station provided by Open Road Shuttle.  For those arriving from the west, there is a three hour layover before the 8:00 am departure to the Canyon.  If you are going back west, the bus leaves the Maswik Lodge at 6:15 pm and arrives at the Flagstaff Amtrak station at 8:00 pm, which is about an hour before your departure on the Southwest Chief.

Coming from the east, again, it is less convenient.  Upon your late evening arrival in Flagstaff, you will probably want to reserve a hotel room before taking the 8:00 am departure described above.  Going back east, you may also wish to rent a hotel room since the train leaves Flagstaff in the morning.

Three:  You may wish to reserve a rental car for maximum flexibility.  Since the Amtrak arrivals and departures in the area are not doing normal business hours, you should probably rent from an airport facility that has extended hours.  Your best bet to find such a facility by the Grand Canyon is at the Flagstaff Pulliam Airport.  Check with your rental car agency to see whether they can pick you up at the train station or if you will need to take a taxi to get there.

Four:  If you really want to go to the North Rim and do not have a car, there is a bus service run by Transcanyon Shuttle.  The service leaves the South Rim at 1:30 pm and arrives at the North Rim 4 ½ hours later.  The return bus leaves the North Rim at 7:00 am.  Obviously, the service runs only form mid-May to mid-October when the North Rim is open.

Five:  The Southwest Chief is an all-reserved train.  Whether you are experiencing Amtrak’s coach service or the Superliner sleeping accommodations, you must make advanced reservations.  By buying your tickets in advance for both Amtrak and local transportation services near the Grand Canyon, you may be able to receive discounted advance purchase fares or special fares for students and seniors.