Aero-TV: Cessna’s Next-Gen CJ – The Citation CJ4 (Part 1)

December 15, 2009

A Much Upgraded CJ Makes Ready To Enter The Market

If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it… how many times have you heard that? Well, as good as that advice might be for most folks, its but an unfair limitation on the folks at Cessna who have a habit of taking perfectly great little airplanes and tweaking them enough to make them remarkably and demonstrably better… as appears to be th case with Cessna’s upcoming CJ4.

The keyword involved with the CJ4 program is “More.” The CJ4 adds a number of aerodynamic enhancements as well as the Williams FJ44-4A engine to amp up the performance benefits numbers. Each of the FJ-44As generates 3,400 pounds of thrust, while the resultant max payload becomes 2100 pounds — with a full-fuel payload of a solid 1000 pounds. At max takeoff weight, the CJ4 will require as little as 3300 feet of runway and only 2665 feet to land.

CJ4s can also climb directly to 45,000 feet in just 28 minutes, and offer up a cruise of 451 knots — putting it solidly in the ‘500-mph club.’ With its NBAA IFR 100 nm reserves, the CJ4 boasts a range of 1963 nm. Like the rest of the CJ pack, the FADEC-augmented bird is designed for eventual single-pilot certification.
Copyright 2009, Aero-News Network, Inc., ALL Rights Reserved.

FMI: www.cessna.com, www.aero-tv.net, www.youtube.com/aerotvnetwork, www.twitter.com/aeronews

Duration : 0:7:39

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Aero-TV: Cessna’s Next-Gen CJ – The Citation CJ4 (Part 2)

December 10, 2009

A Much Upgraded CJ Makes Ready To Enter The Market
If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it… how many times have you heard that? Well, as good as that advice might be for most folks, its but an unfair limitation on the folks at Cessna who have a habit of taking perfectly great little airplanes and tweaking them enough to make them remarkably and demonstrably better… as appears to be th case with Cessna’s upcoming CJ4.
The keyword involved with the CJ4 program is “More.” The CJ4 adds a number of aerodynamic enhancements as well as the Williams FJ44-4A engine to amp up the performance benefits numbers. Each of the FJ-44As generates 3,400 pounds of thrust, while the resultant max payload becomes 2100 pounds — with a full-fuel payload of a solid 1000 pounds. At max takeoff weight, the CJ4 will require as little as 3300 feet of runway and only 2665 feet to land.
CJ4s can also climb directly to 45,000 feet in just 28 minutes, and offer up a cruise of 451 knots — putting it solidly in the ‘500-mph club.’ With its NBAA IFR 100 nm reserves, the CJ4 boasts a range of 1963 nm. Like the rest of the CJ pack, the FADEC-augmented bird is designed for eventual single-pilot certification.
Copyright 2009, Aero-News Network, Inc., ALL Rights Reserved.

FMI: www.cessna.com, www.aero-tv.net, www.youtube.com/aerotvnetwork, www.twitter.com/aeronews

Duration : 0:8:56

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ANN Flight Test – Flying Cessna’s Skycatcher

November 18, 2009

Finally… ANN is proud to present the first published flight test data on Cessna’s long-awaited LSA… the C-162 Skycatcher. Worth the wait, the Cessna 162 may be one of Cessna’s very best efforts yet… thoroughly maximizing what it is to be an LSA… while being true to the outstanding stability and control profiles that have been a part and parcel of Cessna’s entry-level aircraft products for many decades.
Right up front, let us tell you, the Skycatcher does NOT disappoint… it is a thoroughly sweet little airplane with great manners, a pleasant aerodynamic profile, as good a performance envelope as LSA regs allow and on top of all that, is just plain fun to fly. In other words, the Skycatcher is one heck of a nice little airplane and a fitting way for Cessna to put its best foot forward in bringing forth a new generation of entry level airplanes. Of particular note is Garmin’s EXCELLENT G300 glass panel, the easily operated and powerful addition of the TCM O-200D and the WIDE comfy cabin. But More than that… its just a sweetie in the air… simple, reasonably fast, agile and with nary the hint of a bad habit. Yeah, we had a ball with the critter.
Cessna’s minions tell ANN that the SkyCatcher is designed from spinner to tail to set the new standard for an entry-level aircraft. Though manufactured as an LSA, the SkyCatcher meets all the required ASTM standards for certification while providing safety, reliability, and utility.
The airplane is equipped with the proprietary Garmin G300 avionics package, and is powered by a composite propeller mated to a Continental O-200D engine developed specifically for the Light Sport market. It also features a 44-inch wide cabin, ergonomic seats, accessible cargo area, and a unique under-panel center stick control. Cessna claims the industry’s most extensive network of dealers and service centers.
Copyright 2009, Aero-News Network, Inc., ALL Rights Reserved.

FMI: www.cessna.com,
www.aero-tv.net,
www.youtube.com/aerotvnetwork,
www.twitter.com/aeronews

Duration : 0:5:37

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FLight 175 speed challenge. 911 ‘planes’ impossible speed.

June 5, 2009

FLIGHT 175 SPEED CHALLENGE

M.I.T. 503 mph – 437 knots?
F.A.A. 586 mph – 509 knots?
N.I.S.T 546 mph – 474 knots?
F.E.M.A 590 mph – 512 knots??!!

MY TEST – above 360 mph – 320 knots level flight is impossible. The ‘ hijackers ‘ did not possess the knowledge and training to be able to accurately ‘trim’ a 767.
They spent a total of 6 hours in an old style 727 pit simulator and were given temporary 6 month licenses to fly small 2 engined aircraft.

911 LIES ARE SO THICK YOU COULD WALK ACROSS THE HUDSON RIVER ON THEM.

Microsoft FS2004 with PMDG ‘QUEEN OF THE SKIES’ 747 simulation – award winning accuracy.
http://www.precisionmanuals.com/priv/pages/prod/fs9/744.html

YOU still think planes hit the towers??

Watch ‘September CLues’ here on YT
visit this site www.pumpitout.com
TURN OFF YOUR TV.

Duration : 0:8:17

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FullFlap.TV – Which system to learn to be an airline pilot 30th Mar 09

June 4, 2009

http://www.fullflap.tv Every week.

Today: 3rd June 09
If you want to become an airline pilot there are basically two systems. FAA and JAA. So which should you do? We talk to Delta Aviation Academy and Gestair. Another interview from our series of Flyer show interviews. FullFlap.TV Private, Commercial, Fun – Monday, Wednesday and Friday Aviation TV for the new era of flying. More at http://www.fullflap.tv

Duration : 0:6:19

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Flight 1549 Plane Crash Hero Pilot Chesley B. “Sully” Sullenberger Airbus 320

January 18, 2009

This is a Genuine G-Shot prepared in tribute to a true hero: Captain “Sully” Sullenberger, the Airbus 320 pilot who made the remarkable emergency miracle water landing yesterday of US Airway Flight 1549 on New York’s Hudson River in New York City.

Experience does indeed count, I am about the same age as Capt. Sully, with 27 years experience as a San Francisco 911 police, fire and medical dispatchers with the City and County of SF Department of Emergency Management. I can also attest to the value of training and experience and the need to keep a cool head as so many lives depends upon our every move when seconds really do count.

Well done Captain Sully, we all have reason to be proud of you as a real American hero.

Gary J. Mondfrans
—————–

NEW YORK (AP) — A cool-headed pilot maneuvered his crippled jetliner over New York City and ditched it in the frigid Hudson River on Thursday; all 155 on board were pulled to safety as the plane slowly sank. It was,As New York Governor Patterso said, “a miracle on the Hudson.”

One victim suffered two broken legs, a paramedic said, but there were no other reports of serious injuries, just lots of wet socks, Capt. Sully walked the entire length of the sinking aircraft twice to make sures all souls had safely exited the plane.

US Airways Flight 1549, an Airbus A320 bound for Charlotte, N.C., struck a flock of birds after takeoff just minutes earlier at LaGuardia Airport, apparently disabling the both engines.

The pilot, identified as Chesley B. “Sully” Sullenberger III of Danville, Calif., “was phenomenal,” passenger Joe Hart said. “He landed it — I tell you what, the impact wasn’t a whole lot more than a rear-end (collision). It threw you into the seat ahead of you.

“Both engines cut out and he actually floated it into the river,” he said.
No doubt due to his 40 years experience as a glider pilot.

Capt. Sully thank you for a job well done!

==================
G-Shots by GARi – www.GShots.com – ‘GShots on YouTUBE’
www.YouTUBE.com/GShotsTV (650) 219-8188 GShots.TV@GMail.com

Duration : 0:4:20

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Aero-TV Chills Out With NASA-Glenn’s Icing Encounter …

October 24, 2008

A Vital Topic… Deserving Of NASA’s Attention (and YOURS)

Late last year, ANN’s Aero-TV crews spied a truly marvelous piece of flight simulation technology… NASA Glenn’s icing flight training simulator. Demonstrated at the Interservice/Industry Training, Simulation and Education Conference (I/ITSEC), we were incredibly impressed at the apparent accuracy of the model (ANN’s Jim Campbell has plenty of Twin Otter time — the aircraft used in the icing encounter sim model — and knows only too well that the icing behavior they displayed is what he has experienced, personally, in real icing conditions).

The high-fidelity simulation model for icing effects flight training was developed from wind tunnel data for the DeHavilland DHC-6 Twin Otter aircraft. First, a flight model of the un-iced airplane was developed and then modifications were generated to model the icing conditions.

The models were validated against data records from the NASA Twin Otter Icing Research flight test program with only minimal refinements being required. The goals of this program were to demonstrate the effectiveness of such a simulator for training pilots to recognize and recover from icing situations and to establish a process for modeling icing effects to be used for future training devices.

NASA notes that ‘Developing flight simulators that incorporate the aerodynamic effects of icing will provide a critical element in pilot training programs by giving pilots a pre-exposure of icing-related hazards, such as ice-contaminated roll upset or tailplane stall. Integrating these effects into training flight simulators will provide an accurate representation of scenarios to develop pilot skills in unusual attitudes and loss-of-control events that may result from airframe icing.’

ANN first saw this technology demonstrated at I/ITSEC, an organization that promotes cooperation among the Armed Services, Industry, Academia and various Government agencies in pursuit of improved training and education programs, identification …

Duration : 0:9:2

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Aero-TV: Learning The Truth About The MU-2 SFAR

October 22, 2008

Let’s Talk About The MU-2 With An Expert… ANN has always found the controversy over the airworthiness of the MU-2 an argument of political hype over reality. Much maligned over a number of highly visible accidents (often hyped by some politicos with an aviation-ignorant agenda), the truth of the matter is that the MU-2 is a of an airplane… and PROPERLY trained and flown, this is a serious working airplane. To separate the “Bravo Sierra” from the reality of the matter, ANN and Aero-TV interviewed and flew with MU-2 expert Pat Cannon to detail the TRUE nature of this airplane and the community that has grown around it… especially in light of the recent SFAR actions. After receiving numerous comments from both private and commercial operators of the Mitsubishi MU-2 turboprop — as well as owner representatives, and the plane’s manufacturer — the FAA has gone forward with its call for a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR) calling for new pilot training, experience, and operating requirements for the speedy aircraft. The final rule mandates a comprehensive standardized pilot training program for the MU-2. The regulation requires use of a standardized pit checklist and the latest revision of the Airplane Flight Manual. MU-2 operators also must have a working autopilot onboard except in certain limited circumstances. Owners and operators must comply with the SFAR within a year. The FAA’s requirements follow an increased accident and incident rate in the MU-b over the past four years, and are based on a safety evaluation of the MU-2 conducted by the agency since July 2005. This SFAR mandates additional training, experience, and operating requirements to improve the level of operational safety for the MU-2. “The FAA studies enormous amounts of data looking for trends,” said FAA ociate Administrator for Aviation Safety Nick Sabatini. “When we saw the rising accident rate for the MU-2, we decided to take appropriate actions to bring the plane up to an acceptable level of safety.” In its …

Duration : 0:8:22

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